Kitsuke for kimono / 着物の着付け


12月頭のことですが、知人のSさんの着物の着付けをさせて頂きました。娘さんの学校の親御(おやご)さんが集まるパーティーがホテルであって、色々な国の方が参加するし、せっかくなので着物を着て行きたいということでした。

I had “kitsuke” of kimono to a friend of mine, Ms. S in the beginning of December. Her daughter’s school had a party at hotel for student’s parents, therefore she wanted to wear a Japanese traditional cloth. It was good opportunity to introduce one of Japanese cultures to other parents who were from many different countries.

※着付け(きつけ/ kitsuke):人に着物を着せること
To dress someone in kimono (Noun)


Sさんは日本で仕立てた着物をお持ちで、濃い紫のシルク生地に繊細で上品模様がついた、それはそれはとても美しい着物です。ご自分でも着付けの勉強をされたそうですが、今回は私に着付ける機会をくださいました。

She has a kimono which was tailored in Japan, which had a delicate and stylish pattern on a dark purple silk. That was extremely beautiful. She also learned how to wear kimono by herself, however she gave me an opportunity to do that in Amsterdam.


着物を自分で着られない日本人は多いんですよ。というより、ほとんどかもしれません。私も着物学校に通うまではそうでした。

There are many Japanese people who don’t know how to wear kimono, actually I can tell, “Most of Japanese people cannot wear kimono by themselves”. I used to be one of them until I learned it at a Kimono school.


さて、話を戻します。
ホテルにあるスパの更衣室で着替えができるということで、そこで着付けをしました。
着物を着たSさんは素晴らしくエレガントで、ママ友の方達にも、「綺麗(きれい)!」「素晴らしい!」「ゴージャス!」などと声をかけられていました。着物を初めて見た方達も多かったと思います。
ご自分に合った着物を仕立てているということもあり、本当によくお似合いでため息が何度も出ましたよ。

Now, let me get back on the track. 
We could use a dressing room of spa at hotel and I did kitsuke there. She looked super elegant in kimono! Her friends who saw her said, “Beautiful!”, “Wonderful!”, “Gorgeous!” and more. I think many of them saw a real kimono for the first time. Her kimono was tailored just for herself and it suited her well. I was also impressive like them.


イブニングドレスも素敵ですが、着物はそれとは違った日本らしい上品さ、そして華やかさがあると改めて感じました。

I know that an evening dress is gorgeous as well, however kimono has some classic and glamorous tastes with a very-Japanese-simbolic-style and it is different, I felt. 



さて、帯ですが、今回はSさんのご希望でお太鼓ではなく変わり帯を作りました。正直にいうと、これは私にとって初挑戦でしたが、問題なく作れたのでよかったです。

By the way, I made “kawari-obi” instead of “otaiko” for an obi-belt as her requested. To be hounest, this was my first challenge to make this shape, however, it was good that I could make it without any problem.

変わり帯(かわりおび / kawari-obi)



今回、オランダに来てからは初めての着付けでしたが、ご本人に喜んで頂けた上、周りの反応も見ることができて幸せな時間になりました。また、着物の素晴らしさ、着物を着た女性の美しさに感動した夜になりました。

This was my first kitsuke after I came to the Netherlands. It was a special night for me since since I could feel she was happy in kimono and I could see how her friends reacted. Also I was very impressed by the beauty of kimono and a lady in kimono.



本当に良い勉強と経験をさせて頂き、Sさんには感謝しかありません。さらに、写真の掲載許可も頂きました。

I am very appreciated it to Ms. S that I could have a great opportunity because of her. I learned a lot from this experience. It is also thankful that she allowed me to use her photos on my blog.


Sさん、本当にありがとうございました!

Thank you very much, Ms. S!



★着付けご依頼の詳細はコチラのページでご覧になれます。
You can check the detail about kitsuke on this page.



★おまけの写真 / Extra photos
ホテルからの帰り道に撮りました。
I took these photos on my way home from hotel after kitsuke.




Japanese greetings for the end and beginning of the year. / 年末年始に使う日本語の挨拶

今日は、日本人が年末年始の挨拶でよく言うフレーズをご紹介します。本当によく使いますから、皆さんも是非使ってくださいね!

Today, I would like to introduce a couple of Japanese phrases which Japanese people often say as greetings in the end and beginning of the year.


★年末(ねんまつ)の挨拶:  Greeting phrase for the end of the year. Used until 31 Dec.

–良いお年をお迎えください。(よい おとしを おむかえください。/ Yoi otoshi o omukaekudasai.)
Hope you will have a good new year.

This a formal way to wish a happy new year until 31st Dec. The casual way is “良いお年を!(よい おとしを! / Yoi otoshi o)”.



【Dialogue】
e.g. ) Usually, A and B say those phrases almost at the same time. Needless to say, please don’t forget to take a bow during saying these!

A:  今年もお世話になりました。来年もよろしくお願いします。
良いお年をお迎えください。
ことしも おせわに なりました。らいねんも よろしく おねがいします。
Kotoshi mo osewani narimashita. Rainen mo yoroshiku onegai itashimasu. Yoi otoshi o omukaekudasai.
Thank you for your kindnees this year as well. Thank you in advance for all your support for this coming year. Hope you will have a good new year.

B:  こちらこそお世話になりました。来年もよろしくお願いします。
こちらこそ おせわになりました。らいねんも よろしく おねがいします。
Kochirakoso osewani narimashita. Rainen mo yoroshiku onegai itashimasu.
Thank you too.Thank you in advance for all your support for this coming year.




★年始(ねんし)の挨拶:  Greeting phrase for the new year. Used from 1 Jan.

–明けましておめでとうございます。(あけまして おめでとう ございます。/ Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu.): Happy new year.

今年もよろしくお願いします。(ことしも よろしく おねがいします。 / Kotoshi mo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.):
Thank you for all your support for this year in advance.


【Dialogue】
e.g. ) Usually, A and B say those phrases almost at the same time. Needless to say, please don’t forget to take a bow during saying these!

A:  明けましておめでとうございます。今年もよろしくお願いします。
あけまして おめでとう ございます。ことしも よろしく おねがいします。
Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu. Kotoshi mo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.
Happy New year. Thank you for all your support for this year in advance.

B:  明けましておめでとうございます。今年もよろしくお願いします。
あけまして おめでとう ございます。ことしも よろしく おねがいします。
Akemashite omedetou gozaimasu. Kotoshi mo yoroshiku onegaishimasu.
Happy New year. Thank you for all your support for this year in advance.


とても仲がいい友達には、「明けましておめでとうございます。今年もよろしくお願いします。」の代わりに、「あけおめ!ことよろ!」と言うこともできます。とてもカジュアルな言い方で、若い人達の間でよく使われます。

You can say to your close friends, “あけおめ!ことよろ!” It is a very casual way and often used among young people.




日本語には、英語に訳すことが難しい言葉やフレーズがいくつかあります。「よろしくお願いします。」もその中の一つです。本当の意味は、日本人が使っている状況を見て、自分でもたくさん使って、そして、感じて覚えて自分のものにしてくださいね!

There are some Japanese words and phrases which are difficult to translate to English and “Yoroshiku onegaishimasu.” is one of them. The good way to practice understanding the real meaning of this is seeing how Japanese people use this phrase, then copying and repeating to use it many times. Feel it and you can make it your own!



Japanese words for the end and beginning of the year, part 2. / 年末年始の日本語 その2

メリークリスマス!
今日はクリスマスですね。日本では、クリスマスが終わると一気に「正月モード」に切り替わります。

ところで、ヨーロッパでは、クリスマスは家族と過ごし年末年始は恋人や友達と過ごすいうのが主流だそうですが、日本では、クリスマスは恋人や友達と過ごして、年末年始は家族と過ごすというのが主流です。
もちろん人によって違うこともあるでしょうが、基本的に反対ですね。

Merry Christmas!
Today is a Christmas day. In Japan, the town will be a “Shogatsu-mood” right after Christmas.

By the way, I heard that European people usually spend time with their family on Christmas and spend time with their lovers or friends on nenmatsu-nenshi. Japanese people usually spend time with their lovers or friends on Christmas and spend time with their family on nenmatsu-nenshi.
Of course it depends on each person, but basically it is opposite.




さて、今日は日本で年末年始に食べる特別な食べ物についていくつかご紹介したいと思います。

Anyway, I would like to introduce a couple of special Japanese cuisines for the nenmatsu-nenshi.

–年越し蕎麦(としこしそば/ toshikoshi-soba): 大晦日の夜に食べる蕎麦です。午前12時になる前に食べます。私のうちではいつも23時45分頃に食べています。

Soba-noodle (buckwheat needle) which is eaten on New Year’s Eve, before midnight. 
My family have toshikoshi-soba around 11:45pm every year.

海老天蕎麦(えびてんそば / Ebi-ten-soba): A shrimp-tenpura soba
かき揚げ蕎麦(かきあげそば / Kaki-age-soba) : A vegetable-tenpura soba


昔から続く習慣なので、大晦日に蕎麦を食べる理由ははっきりしていませんが、よく聞く話が2つあります。

This is an old and traditional custom, therefore the reason is not clear, however, two reasons below are often said.


1. 「蕎麦は長くて伸びるので、寿命を伸ばして、家運も伸ばしたい」という願いが込められている。

This contains a wish for having a long life and good luck since it is the long shape.


2. 「蕎麦は切れやすいので、一年の苦労や悪いことを切り捨てたい」という気持ちで食べる。

It is eaten with a wish of cutting away bad luck of the past year since soba-noodle is easily cut. 




–御節(おせち/ Osechi): 正月三が日(しょうがつ・さんがにち)に食べる料理で、綺麗な重箱に入っていて豪華(ごうか)です。

A set of traditional dishes served in special boxes called juubako, which are eaten from 1 to 3 Jan. It looks very gorgeous.

*正月三が日(しょうがつ・さんがにち/ Shougatsu-sanganichi): Three days of 1 Jan, 2 Jan and 3 Jan.

御節料理(おせち・りょうり / Osechi-ryouri)




–お雑煮(おぞうに/ Ozouni):これも正月に食べます。お餅が入っているスープです。スープの味は地域によって違います。
ちなみに、うちのお雑煮の汁のだしは鰹(かつお)です。

This is also eaten on shougatsu, which is a soup containing mocha rice cakes. The flavors of soup and ingredients are vary depending on the region. By the way, dashi of my family’s ozoni soup is “katsuo (bonito)”

 

お雑煮 1 (おぞうに / ozouni)
お雑煮 2 (おぞうに / ozouni)
お雑煮 3(おぞうに / ozouni)




今、日本では正月も多くの店が開いていますが、昔は正月三が日に開いている店はありませんでした。ですから、三日間同じ食べ物を食べていたのです。私が子供の頃もそうでした。とても静かで、私はあの正月の雰囲気がとても好きでした。便利な世の中になるのはいいことですが、昔ながらの習慣がなくなっていくのは寂しいなとも感じます。

Now, many shops are open during shougatsu in Japan, however, all shops were closed in old days. That was the reason why people had eaten osechi for three days. I remember when I was a little kid, the town was very very quiet and I loved that atmosphere. I feel sad to lose our old customs although it should be good that the world has become quite a convenient one.




皆さんの国にはどんな古い習慣がありますか。
私は大晦日に年越し蕎麦を食べるために、蕎麦を買いました。準備万端です!

What old and traditional customs do you have in your country?
I bought a soba-noodle to eat it on New Year’s Eve. I’m ready for it!.

Japanese words for the end and beginning of the year, part 1. / 年末年始の日本語 その1

日本人にとって、一年で一番大きいイベントは新年のお祝いです。家族や親戚が集まって、美味しい料理を食べたり、お酒を飲んだりしながら一緒に過ごします。

For Japanese people, New Year’s celebration is the biggest event in the year. Family and relatives get together and spend time with. We prepare special dishes and have them with drinks.


日本語には、年末年始に使う特別な言葉があるので、その中からよく使われる言葉をいくつか紹介したいと思います。

There are many special Japanese words for the end and beginning of the year, therefore I would like to introduce some of them which are often used.

新年(しんねん/ shin-nen): A new year

年末年始(ねんまつねんし/ nenmatsu-nenshi): 
the end and beginning of the year

年末(ねんまつ/ nenmatsu):  end of the year

年始(ねんし/ nenshi):beginning of the year


【Dialogue】
e.g. )
A: 年末年始は何をしますか。
Nenmatsu-nenshi wa nani o shimasu ka.

What are you going to do in the end and beginning of the year?

B: 実家に帰って家族と過ごします。
Jikka ni kaette, kazoku to sugoshimasu.

I go back to my parents’ house and spend days with my family.

※実家(じっか/ jikka):The house someone was born. The parents’ house. 



大晦日(おおみそか / oomishoka): New Year’s Eve

元旦(がんたん / gantan): New Year’s Day

正月(しょうがつ / shougatsu):
1年の最初の月。1月。新年を祝う時期。
The first month of a year, January. The season to celebrate New year.



-仕事納め(しごと-おさめ / shigoto-osame ):
年末にその年の仕事を全て終えること。
To finish all work in the end of year.

-仕事始め(しごと-はじめ / shigoto-hajime):
To work for the first time on new year.

【Dialogue】
e.g. 1 )
A: 仕事納めはいつですか。
Shigoto-osame wa itsu desu ka.
When is the last day of working in this year?

B: 28日です。
Nijuu-hachi nichi desu.
It’s 28th.

e.g. 2 )
A: 仕事始めはいつですか。
Shigoto-hajime wa itsu desu ka.
When is the first day of working on new year?

B: 4日です。
Yokka desu.
It’s 4th.


-忘年会(ぼうねんかい / Bou-nen-kai):年末にする飲み会。その年の苦労を忘れるための会。
A drinking party that takes place at the end of the year, to forget bad things in that year.

新年会(しんねんかい / Shin-nen-kai):新年にする飲み会。
A drinking party that takes place at the new year.


別腹(べつばら): Betsubara

ある日、歩いていると、この言葉が目に留まりました。

One day I was walking on the street and this Japanese word caught my eye.

別腹(べつばら): Betsubara


「別腹(べつばら): Betsubara」

みなさん、意味を知っていますか。

Do you know the meaning of this?


★別(べつ: Betsu)=different, separate, another
★腹(はら、ばら: Hara, Bara)=stomach, belly

【別腹】直訳をすると、「おなかが別にある」という意味ですね。
「おなかがいっぱいでもう何も食べられない!」状態でも、「好きなものなら食べられる」と言いたい時に使います。

【Betsubara】A literal translation of this is “You have another stomach”.
Even though you are very full and cannot take another bite, you still can eat your favorite food. ( You always have room for your favarite food.) 


例)
A: あー、おなかいっぱい。もう何も食べられないよ。
B: 今日、ケーキを買ってきたんだけどな。じゃあ明日食べようか。
A: え、ケーキ?!それは食べる!デザートは別腹だよ!
>

e.g.)
A: Ahhh, Onaka ippai. Moo nanimo taberarenai yo.
(I’m so full and can’t eat anymore.) 
B: Kyoo keeki o kattekitandakedona. Jaa, ashita tabeyoo ka.
( I bought cakes for desert today but we can eat them tomorrow.)
A: Eh, keeki?! Sore wa taberu! Dezaato wa betsubara dayo!  
(Cake?! I can eat it now. I have room for desert always!)



私は東京に住んでいた時、友達と飲みに行った帰りに「ラーメンは別腹だよ!」と言って、よく食べに行っていました。もちろん、晩御飯をたくさん食べて、お酒をたくさん飲んだ後にです。これは日本では珍しくありません。日本には美味しいラーメン屋がたくさんありますからね!特に、お酒を飲んだ後にはラーメンが食べたくなるんですよ。理由は分かりませんが。

When I went out to have some drinks with friends of mine in Tokyo, I used to say, “ Ramen wa betsubara dayo! ( I still have room for Ramen!.)”  and went to eat it ramen after we had a big dinner and lots of drinks. I think, I can tell that it is usual for Japanese people and many of us do that. There are many good ramen shops in all over Japan and you can not help it! Especially, you feel like eating it after having some drinks though I do not know the reason why,

みなさんの「別腹」はなんですか。

What is your “betsubara” ?